New Movies for July

July 12th, 2017

Here are the latest DVDs added to our collection:

Absolutely Anything
Alone in Berlin
Everybody Loves Somebody
Grey Lady
Handsome Devil
Land of Mine
The Last Word
Life
Table 19
This Beautiful Fantastic
A United Kingdom
The Autopsy of Jane Doe
Beauty and the Beast
The Lego Batman Movie
The Sense of an Ending

You may browse the entire DVD collection via the library catalog.

Book review: Spider Network and Golden Passport

July 10th, 2017

J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy (reviewed here) has been on the New York Times’ list of best sellers for almost a year and his memoir is one of only 5 titles on Bill Gates’ summer reading list. In his insightful book, Vance illustrates how the consumer-oriented values and chaotic family customs of the working class limit their children’s chances for a prosperous future.

But that is not the whole story. In addition to suffering from their own dysfunctional behaviors, ordinary people are routinely cheated in subtle ways that are impossible to detect. Two new books illustrate how elites are advancing their own agendas, while abandoning a longstanding sense of social responsibility.

book cover imageEnrich, David. The spider network. Custom House, [2017].

Wall Street Journal editor David Enrich tells the story of British math prodigy Tom Hayes, who was convicted of criminal fraud in 2015 for manipulating Libor, the benchmark that underlies the interest rate on loans worldwide. From his first days as a trader in the City of London, Hayes learns that his sole objective is to make money. Working at a series of banks, he speculates on the companies’ own funds, using sophisticated pricing models. Hayes optimizes his performance by working with a group of bankers to change their Libor submissions in the direction favorable to his security holdings.

Executives at powerful banks, Citigroup, Goldman, UBS and others, were complicit; yet these influential people were never held accountable. Oversight from regulators was minimal. Meanwhile, people on Main Street who used a credit card, took out a variable rate mortgage or carried a student loan paid more for interest on those obligations. Those with pensions saw lower returns.

Also available as an audiobook on CD, an audiobook on OverDrive, and an eBook on OverDrive.

book cover imageMcDonald, Duff. The golden passport. Harper Business, [2017].

The Harvard Business School (HBS) proudly claims to educate leaders who make a difference in the world. But business journalist Duff McDonald holds HBS to blame for the key problems in America today — growing inequality and the flawed structure of today’s shareholder capitalism. As the most prominent and largest graduate business school, HBS has shaped countless companies, but also the world’s financial system, the economy and society itself. An HBS MBA is the “golden passport” to influence and wealth.

McDonald explains that HBS created the Socratic case method to train MBA students to operate in an ambiguous environment, to diagnose problems and frame solutions, to prioritize, communicate and act. But he also argues that the case method is backward facing and has armed its graduates with conventional answers to conventional questions. McDonald holds Harvard faculty members responsible for the theories that empower executives to increase stock prices by laying off employees. He also criticizes the pervasive focus on money within the school. MBA’s flock to lucrative consulting and investment banking careers. Administrators fixate on raising money from alumni. Faculty members multiply their salaries by serving as consultants for corporate clients. While the institution revolves around making money, McDonald calls for HBS to live up to its aspiration to make the world a better place.

Also available as an audiobook on CD, an audiobook on OverDrive, an eBook on OverDrive, and on Notable Business Books Kindles at the Ford Library.

© Meg Trauner & Ford Library – Fuqua School of Business.
All rights reserved.

Holiday Closing: Sunday, July 2 – Tuesday, July 4

June 28th, 2017

The Ford Library will be closed Sunday, July 2nd – Tuesday, July 4th in observance of Independence Day.

Summer hours will resume on Wednesday, July 5th.

Wishing you a safe and happy holiday!

Book Review: Black Edge

June 19th, 2017

Kolhatkar, Sheelah. Black Edge: inside information, dirty money, and the quest to bring down the most wanted man on Wall Street. Random House, 2017.

book cover imageStories about powerful people behaving badly make good beach reading, especially if the protagonists are rich financiers and they come to a bad end. Extra points if the books illuminate the workings of Wall Street.

Ruthless hedge fund owner Stephen A. Cohen is the subject of Sheelah Kolhatkar’s new book, Black Edge. The story begins as Cohen graduates from Wharton and begins his career at a small brokerage firm in lower Manhattan. His natural instincts make him a star trader almost immediately. Fearless and self-confident, he generates huge profits by trading large blocks of stock at high frequency.

In 1992, Cohen starts his own hedge fund, SAC Capital Advisors, and by 1995, the company is worth $100 million. He charges exorbitant fees and keeps half the profits. As he grows more powerful, he requires Wall Street bankers to give him advance notice before releasing information that would affect the price of a stock. After SAC surpasses $1 billion in assets, he hires new traders who have personal connections with people working in public companies. He uses these contacts to gather inside information (black edge) that he uses for trading. Cohen becomes one of the richest men in the world.

One of Cohen’s first in-house analysts is Duke engineering alumnus C.B. Lee, who travels to Taiwan and China to gather inside information on companies that manufacture semiconductors. Another early hire is Mathew Martoma, a Stanford MBA, who had attended Duke as an undergrad under the name Ajai Mathew Thomas. Martoma is a biotechnology specialist at SAC who had black edge on pharmaceuticals. After the FBI and SEC investigates, Lee cooperates with law enforcement, while Martoma is convicted of securities fraud and sentenced to prison. He never turns on Cohen, who goes free. At the end of the book, Stephen A. Cohen is more wealthy and powerful than ever. Instead of ending corruption in a powerful industry that operates in the dark, the FBI and SEC stop prosecuting high level corporate criminals on Wall Street.

Sheelah Kolhatkar is a master storyteller. Her entertaining and well-researched book is recommended for anyone interested in finance and ethics. She presents complex material in a clear narrative. Characters are multi-dimensional, including Duke alumni C.B. Lee and Mathew Martoma, who are treated sympathetically. Duke readers note: there is a third university connection — ethics professor Bruce Payne (Sanford School of Public Policy) who is depicted as acting with honesty and integrity.

Also available as an audiobook on OverDrive and as an eBook on OverDrive.

© Meg Trauner & Ford Library – Fuqua School of Business.
All rights reserved.

New Movies for June

June 15th, 2017

Here are the latest DVDs in our collection:

Collide
A Dog’s Purpose
Get Out
Gold
The Great Wall
Logan
My Life as a Zucchini
Rings
The Salesman
Silicon Valley, season 3
A Street Cat named Bob
The Void
Before I Fall
Queen Sugar, season 1
The Space Between Us

You may browse the entire DVD collection via the library catalog.

Book Review Update: The Circle

June 2nd, 2017

book-coverThe film The Circle was released last month and has already grossed $170 million. Reviews have been negative, but that has not stopped readers from wanting to read the book that the film was based on.

I reviewed The Circle by Dave Eggers on this blog in 2015, after it was selected as one of the best business books of 2014 by leadership expert James O’Toole. In Eggers’ novel, The Circle is the name of the powerful internet company that replaces Google, Facebook, Twitter with one unified corporation that offers a single account for email, banking, social media and all other identity needs. The goal of the company is to improve the world, through utility, efficiency and transparency.

The story is about a young woman who lands a customer relations job at The Circle and is selected for a new technology project at the company. Employees are pressured to share their experiences through social media and in company sponsored events. This habit of online sharing intensifies into constant surveillance called “transparency.” Employee performance is based on feedback from millions of nameless users.

As time passes at The Circle, relationships become superficial and everyday communication sounds hollow. Individuals are conscious of everything they do and filter everything they say. As employees begin spending all their time at work, life becomes one-dimensional.

While not a great book, The Circle provokes ideas about workplace culture, privacy, surveillance and freedom. I recommend The Circle to anyone interested in the culture of organizations as well as those concerned about the changes in society arising from use of the internet.

© Meg Trauner & Ford Library – Fuqua School of Business.
All rights reserved.

New Movies for May

May 17th, 2017

Here are the latest titles added to our DVD collection:

The Book of LoveGreat British Baking DVD cover
The Founder
The Girl With All the Gifts
The Great British Baking Show, season 1
Hidden Figures
Justice League Dark
La La Land
Lion
Monster Trucks
Office Christmas Party
Paterson
Split
Toni Erdmann

You may browse the entire DVD collection via the library catalog.

Library Databases and Internships

May 12th, 2017

laptop-user

Congratulations on finishing your first year at Fuqua! This post will fill in our rising Second Years on how to correctly use the online resources available to you during summer break.

The key point to consider when using library databases is to avoid the transfer of entire reports, articles, or data content from academically licensed databases to your summer employer. Transferring database content to a summer employer breaches our license with the vendor; and could cost the breaching user, and all of Duke, their access to the database.

Using databases to prepare for your internship without the transfer of content may be permissible. Please review the examples of appropriate and inappropriate use described on our web site; and email us if you have any questions.

Fine Forgiveness Event

April 26th, 2017


 
Are you graduating or just heading out soon for the summer and worried about paying library fines? May 1st through May 12th, the Ford Library will waive one overdue library fine* for each “shelfie” you post to Instagram or Facebook, up to five fine waives total.

It’s easy!

1 Snap a “shelfie,” i.e. a book-related photo. It could be of a favorite book or place to read, a “book face,” or a photo featuring the Ford Library and/or its collections.
2. Post the photo to your Instagram account or to Ford Library’s Facebook page with #fordlibraryshelfie
3. Send us an email to let us know you have posted it.

Please note: Your Instagram profile must be set to public during the promotion so that we can see your photo and we have to approve posts to our Facebook page before they will appear.

Rules:
1. All Duke University students are eligible to participate.
2. Each photo must be tagged #fordlibraryshelfie and posted between Monday, May 1st and Friday, May 12th, 2017. Your photo(s) may be shared, copied, and used in Ford Library promotional material.
3. A maximum of five overdue fine waives total will be allowed per student during the promotion.
4. * Waives apply to overdue fines incurred in the last 6 months (from November 2016 – April 2017) only.
5. * Waives will not apply to items that have not yet been returned, for fines that were incurred at other Duke University Libraries, or for recall fines (where another patron was waiting for the overdue item). This promotion is in addition to our existing one-time waive policy.

Questions? Email: ford-library-circulation@fuqua.duke.edu

Economic Evolution

April 19th, 2017

Americans are living in a time of unprecedented prosperity. At the beginning of the 20th century, life at home and at work was dull, dangerous and uncomfortable. Today, average Americans live as comfortably as royalty a few decades ago, and have more leisure time. Four new books combine economics and history to provide ideas on how prosperity evolved in our modern age and insights into what is likely to happen in the lean years ahead.
 
book cover imageThe Rise and Fall of American Growth by Robert J. Gordon
The technological, economic and social transformations that drove the rise in prosperity between 1870 and 1970 overshadow today’s advances in communication and information technologies, which have not produced a comparable prosperity.
 
 
 
 
book cover imageEmpire of Things by Frank Trentmann
Since the dawn of civilization, people’s role or work defined who they were, but in today’s consumer culture, material possessions display identity. The transformation to a worldwide consumer society developed over the past 5 centuries and changed the course of history.
 
Also available as an eBook on OverDrive.
 
 
book cover imageBourgeois Equality by Deirdre Nansen McCloskey
Citizens in advanced nations are better off than they were in 1800 by an astounding 3000%. The reason?
Innovation. In Europe, ideas for inventions were widely disseminated for the first time under a new ideology of individual dignity for common people and their right to improve their lives.
 
 
 
 
book cover imageMoney Changes Everything by William N. Goetzmann
A financial historian explains how the development of finance made civilizations possible. A tool for managing time and risk, finance was an innovation that permitted individuals to move economic value forward and backward through time – allowing people to imagine and to calculate a future.
 
Also available as an eBook.
 

© Meg Trauner & Ford Library – Fuqua School of Business.
All rights reserved.